Know Your Product

If you are asked a question about the product you manage, there are only two answers that will suffice:

  1. The answer to the question.
  2. “I don’t know, but I’ll find out for you.”

If you aren’t the expert on your product, then you’ve got work to do. There should be very few stumpers when it comes to the ins-and-outs of what your product does, what it’s good for and how to use it.

Count the “I don’t knows”

It’s not the end of the world if someone asks you something and you don’t have the answer at hand. You can’t know it all. But if you find yourself saying, “I don’t know…” a little too frequently, then it’s time to dig in and give yourself an in-depth refresher on just what you are building.

Most importantly, when you don’t know something, make it a priority to get the answer. You owe it to the person who asked (especially if it’s a customer) and you owe it to yourself and your team.

But I just got here!

It’s particularly tough for product managers who didn’t work on the product from the start. It’s not an easy job to get up to speed and become an expert user. But that’s your job.

Photo credit: Christopher Sessums
Photo credit: Christopher Sessums
Don’t overlook users when it comes to learning about your product. Watch them use it. Talk to your support team and ask to watch them work.

Once you think you know everything there is to know, go back and learn some more.

Why it matters

It’s hard enough to build a great product with all of the information and experience and knowledge. Having less than the full picture puts you at a huge disadvantage.

Knowing exactly how (and why) things work the way they do gives you the great insight to understand how to make it even better. Seeing where you get frustrated, or watching your users run into roadblocks shows you where you’re coming up short.

When it comes to leading a team, not knowing how things work puts you in a tough spot. It’s a waste of a developer’s time when she or he has to explain that the feature you asked them to build is already there. Support has enough work to do supporting customers…don’t make them spend valuable time on you. Marketing should be able to lean on you to explain how something works and why it matters to your customers.

Be the expert on your product.